Information for Reproductive Health and Sexually Transmitted Disease Practitioners and Program Directors

Project Summary
Region III Chlamydia Project Overview
Administration of the Chlamydia III Project
National Chlamydia Prevention Efforts
Region III Infertility Prevention Project
Strategic Planning
Strategic Planning Action Areas
Chlamydia
Contacts



Project Summary

Infections due to Chlamydia trachomatis are among the most prevalent of all sexually transmitted diseases in the United States, with an estimated 3 million new infections occurring each year.


Region III Chlamydia Project Overview

The overall goal of the Region III Chlamydia Project is to assess and reduce the prevalence of chlamydia and its associated complications in FP and STD clinics and other community-based provider populations, through a program consisting of outreach, education, screening, treatment and follow-up. Funds granted through this project are intended to expand services to women in need, rather than replace or supplant existing service dollars.

The Region III Chlamydia Project operates through the collaborative efforts of sexually transmitted disease (STD), family planning (FP), and laboratory providers throughout Region III. Region III includes 6 states (Delaware, District of Columbia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia) and two discreet urban areas (Baltimore and Philadelphia). Chlamydia projects operate in the other nine HHS regions around the country.

Representatives from FP and STD Programs from Region III first met in January 1993, to form the Region III Chlamydia Project Advisory Committee. The committee is composed of nine family planning grantees, eight STD program managers, eight public health laboratory directors, three provider representatives, and two medical consultants. Five subcommittees - Screening and Services, Data, Training, Laboratory, and Quality Assurance are charged with exploring issues related to their particular subject, and presenting recommendations to the full Committee for consideration. Since June,1993, this Committee has met regularly to plan and carry out activities related to achieving the goals set forth by the National Infertility Prevention Program.

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Administration of the Region III Chlamydia Project

The Family Planning Council administers this project in Region III, and provides coordination and support to the Advisory Committee and the Project. The CDC provides ongoing guidance and technical assistance in the operation of the project, including the provision of up-to-date information on testing, treatment, surveillance, and other vital components of a chlamydia prevention program.


National Chlamydia Prevention Efforts

The Region III Chlamydia Project is part of the National Infertility Prevention Program coordinated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Chlamydia prevention efforts began in 1988 when CDC and the Office of Population Affairs (OPA) initiated a chlamydia demonstration project in the northwest United States, Health and Human Services (HHS) Region X. In 1992, this demonstration project was expanded to include HHS Regions III, VII, and VIII, and in 1995 expanded to all regions in the United States forming the National Infertility Prevention Program. These projects are funded through Infertility Prevention legislation, which aims to reduce the costly and destructive sequelae of chlamydia and other sexually transmitted diseases on the reproductive health of women.

For more information about STD trends, conferences, special projects and disease facts and information please visit the CDC's Division of Sexually Transmitted Disease website.

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Region III Infertility Prevention Project

The Region III Infertility Prevention Project works to prevent Sexually Transmitted Disease-related infertility by promoting best practices in chlamydia and gonorrhea screening and prevention programs throughout the mid-Atlantic states.

The Prevention Project website is a resource for professionals involved in the design and delivery of screening programs to prevent and control the transmission of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae infections.

It includes information about "best practice" Guidelines, laboratory test technologies, professional development, training resources, related research, and chlamydia and gonorrhea disease burden as well as links to STD resources.


Strategic Planning

In 1998, motivated by the unique challenges faced by the Project in a constantly changing healthcare environment, the Region III Chlamydia Project Advisory Committee embarked on a Strategic Planning Initiative. The Initiative's objective was to develop a strategic plan for the period 2000 through 2002. The Plan is based on the goal of reducing the burden of chlamydia through the expansion of prevention, screening and treatment services.

The following Action Areas have been developed as the framework for implementing the Region III Chlamydia Project's Strategic Plan for the years 2000 through 2002:

It is possible to view, download and print our Strategic Plan in Portable Document Format (PDF). Adobe PDF files require Acrobat Reader software.
If you do not have Adobe Acrobat Reader installed on your computer, click here to download Acrobat Reader free of charge.<image-adobe acrobat download>


Strategic Planning Action Areas

Action Area I: Increased integration of chlamydia services into private
health care including managed care organizations.

Action Area II: Improved and enhanced chlamydia screening services.

Action Area III: Increased and improved public knowledge.

Action Area IV: Increased identification of and development of services
for emerging client groups.

Action Area V: Enhanced partner management services.

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Chlamydia

Infections due to Chlamydia trachomatis are among the most prevalent of all sexually transmitted diseases in the United States, with an estimated 3 million new infections occurring each year. These infections often result in pelvic inflammatory disease, which can cause infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain in women. Untreated chlamydia can also cause urethritis in men. In addition, pregnant women infected with chlamydia can infect their babies during delivery. Almost 80% of chlamydia infections in women and over 50% of chlamydial infections in men are asymptomatic.

More about Chlamydia .


Contacts:

Pamela Nathanson Region III Chlamydia Project Director (215) 985-6754
Dawn Middleton Region III Chlamydia Project Coordinator (215) 985-2609

STDPrograms@familyplanning.org


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